Prince William presents prizes for virtual Tusk Conservation Awards

​Prince William joins a host of famous faces including Katherine Jenkins to present namesake prize and £100,000 grant to an African ranger for virtual Tusk Conservation Awards

  • Prince William helped announce winners of Tusk Conservation Awards 2020
  • The Duke of Cambridge, 38, spoke via a video call from Kensington Palace 
  • He revealed the victor of the Prince William Award for Conservation in Africa 

Prince William has helped announce the winners of this year’s virtual Tusk Conservation Awards alongside famous faces, such as presenter Ben Fogle and singer Katherine Jenkins.

The Duke of Cambridge, 38, spoke via a video call from Kensington Palace in a clip shared to Instagram this evening, where he revealed the victor of the Prince William Award for Conservation in Africa.

He was ‘delighted’ to present the lifetime achievement prize – given to an individual for their outstanding dedication to wildlife conservation – to Hipólito Lima, a rangers supervisor, from São Tomé and Príncipe, who has dedicated 26 years of his life to helping sea turtles survive.

Launched with Prince William in 2013, the annual ceremony celebrates the achievements of extraordinary people, whose work protecting Africa’s natural heritage might otherwise go unnoticed outside their fields.

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The Duke of Cambridge (pictured), 38, spoke via a video call from Kensington Palace in a clip shared to Instagram this evening, where he revealed the victor of the Prince William Award for Conservation in Africa

The Duke of Cambridge joined famous faces including host Kate Silverton, Emma Weymouth, Katherine Jenkins, Levison Wood, Liz Bonnin, Tristan Phipps, Deborah Meaden, Bear Grylls and Ben Fogle to reveal this year’s winners.

During an earlier video call with Charlie Mayhew, CEO of Tusk, The Duke of Cambridge said of this year’s nominees and winners: ‘A lot of these people go under the radar. I hope that the Tusk Awards highlight and showcase their wonderful talent and hard work across the globe.

‘I hope their stories go far and wide, that people feel inspired and young people look to these role models and say “I can do the same, I want to be involved and I care as much as they do too.”’

Prince William helped announce the winners of this year’s virtual Tusk Conservation Awards alongside famous faces, such as presenter Ben Fogle (pictured)

Singing sensation Katherine Jenkins (pictured) also virtually appeared at the online Tusk Conservation Awards this evening


Deborah Meaden (pictured left) and Bear Grylls (pictured right) appearing at the online Tusk Conservation Awards

Award-winner Hipólito Lima has dedicated 26 years of his life to sea turtle conservation, protecting sea turtle females and their nests, monitoring the nesting beaches, training local rangers, and empowering local communities into sea turtle guardians and conservation leaders. 

His leadership has been crucial in lobbying the government for the establishment of legislation that would provide protection for sea turtles in the archipelago. 

This new legislation declares a complete ban on the capture, possession, and sale of all sea turtle species and their by-products as well as disturbance of nesting habitats.

The winner of the Prince William Award for Conservation in Africa receives a grant of £100,000 towards their work. 

Hipolito Lima, winner of the Prince William Award for Conservation in Africa, speaking to the charity’s Royal Patron, the Duke of Cambridge at the online Tusk Conservation Awards

William previously met finalists George Owoyesigire from Uganda, Ian Stevenson of Zambia, and John Kamanga from Kenya, and congratulated them on their dedication and exceptional contribution to African wildlife protection

The two other category winners were John Kamanga, a grassroots conservation leader from Kenya, who won the The Tusk Award for Conservation in Africa, and Amos Gwema, a Zimbabwe Parks and Wildlife Management Authority Principal Intelligence Officer, who was given the Tusk Wildlife Ranger Award.

Speaking about the three category winners, Charlie Mayhew, CEO of Tusk said: ‘As the future of the natural world is brought into even sharper focus, it is fantastic that the recipients of our awards can continue their vital work thanks to this much needed boost to grant funding. 

‘I am very pleased today to award three exceptional leaders within their fields.’ The three winners have each received a trophy specially crafted by Patrick Mavros.

Stunning Tusk Award trophies from Kate’s favourite African jewellery brand 

This year’s stunning Tusk Award trophy was sourced from Kate’s favourite African jewellery brand – Zimbabwean silversmith Patrick Mavros

This year’s stunning Tusk Award trophies were sourced from Kate’s favourite African jewellery brand – Zimbabwean silversmith Patrick Mavros.

The intricate awards were designed specifically for the three individual winners, and paid respects to their chosen fields of conservation. 

They featured a giraffe, an elephant and trio of turtles mounted on a tall black wooden base adorned with silver tusks. Like most commissioned Mavros pieces they would have taken months to create in the studio and are likely to be worth around £8,000 each. 

The brand also supplied elephant and turtle trophies for the awards. 

The Duchess of Cambridge is a big fan of the luxury African brand, which has branches in Zimbabwe, Mauritius, Kenya and London, and owns a number of pieces which she has showcased over the years.

At her family’s private screening of Sir David Attenborough’s A Life on Our Planet in October she chose to wear a pair of Mavros Pangolin Haka earrings, £180, a thoughtful gesture to one of Sir David’s favourite creatures and the most trafficked mammal in the world.  

Kate also owns a pair of Ndoro elephant earrings which she wore while attending a polo match in 2009. She wore a set of Mavros glittering drop earrings evening reception for the Tusk Trust and United for Wildlife in 2014, and owns crocodile stud earrings and a Zozo elephant pendant.

At the Cambridge family’s private screening of Sir David Attenborough’s A Life on Our Planet in October Kate chose to wear a pair of Mavros Pangolin Haka earrings, £180, a thoughtful gesture to one of Sir David’s favourite creatures and the most trafficked mammal in the world


In May (left) Kate donned the £900 Ocean Tides Milky Quartz earrings with 18ct gold in silver. The earrings are inspired by the Indian Ocean and feature polished stones dangling elegantly from carefully crafted sea urchins. Kate also has the earrings in solid 18ct gold which she wore for a visit to Queen Elizabeth Hospital in King’s Lynn as part of the NHS birthday celebrations in July (right)

Kate, pictured in New York in 2014, also owns crocodile stud earrings from Patrick Mavros

Kate is believed to have discovered Patrick Mavros when she was designing jewellery at Jigsaw. She introduced Prince William and Prince Harry to the designer, and the Cambridges are believed to own a selection of the firm’s miniatures which they keep at their apartment in Kensington Palace.

The story of the family business began out of love when Patrick created a pair of earrings for his wife Catja, who wore them to the hair salon where her hairdresser saw them and requested a pair to be made for her. 

Soon afterwards all the other ladies who frequented the salon were asking for similar earrings and the journey as Africa’s luxury house began.

The Mavros business has been an international success story and clients include J.K. Rowling, The King of Spain and Denzel Washington. 

Patrick’s sons are carrying on the legacy of the business; Alexander, a known friend of the royals, runs their boutiques, and Forbes and Patrick Jnr head up the design and craftsmanship from the island of Mauritius and their home in Zimbabwe.

Patrick Mavros’ business has been so successful that three of his four sons have followed him into the profession. Pictured: the family


Patrick Mavros also supplied elephant (left) and turtle (right) trophies for the awards

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