Sex worker felt ‘dehumanised’ by experience on Jeremy Kyle Show

Sex worker who was ‘duped’ into appearing on The Jeremy Kyle Show claims the host wrongly accused her of sleeping with 20,000 men at her family home and told the audience to ‘heckle’ her

  • Charlotte Rose, from Nottingham, was a guest on the Jeremy Kyle Show in 2017
  • Was told show would be new format to discuss stigma of sex work with Jeremy
  • Shocked when host claimed she’d slept with 20K men with daughter in the house
  • Claims Kyle was ‘aggressive’ to her partner and told the audience to heckle them
  • Mother-of-two says she was locked in studio for two hours until Kyle left building 
  • Mortifying experience made her shy away for six months and still affects her now

A sex worker who claims she was ‘duped’ into appearing on The Jeremy Kyle Show has described the experience as ‘mortifying’, after the host falsely claimed she’d slept with more than 20,000 men while her daughter was in the house.

Charlotte Rose, 37, from Nottingham, said she felt ‘dehumanised’ after the audience were told to ‘heckle’ her and her partner ‘as much as they wanted’.

The mother-of-two claims she believed she was going on a completely different show with a radical new format, during which she’d discuss the stigma surrounding the sex industry with Kyle, 53, without an audience present.

But when she arrived at the studios, it was ‘very much a different story’.

Charlotte Rose, 37, from Nottingham, said she felt ‘dehumanised’ after appearing on The Jeremy Kyle Show in 2017 – and managed to get the episode pulled

Appearing as a guest on BBC Radio London today, she told presenter Vanessa Feltz: ‘We came out on stage, I was introduced as somebody who’d slept with over 20,000 men in our martial home whilst our daughter was in the house.’

Branding the claim ‘ridiculous’, Charlotte insisted she had refused to tell producers how many men she’d had sex with because she found the question ‘derogatory’.

When her partner Colin Chapman, who was already on the stage, pointed out this claim was a fabrication, Kyle allegedly replied: ‘OK we’ll cut and edit that.’

She said the host was aggressive to her partner, branding him a ‘smart a***’ when he corrected him, and told how they left the stage to a chorus of ‘boos’ from the crowd.

Appearing as a guest on BBC Radio London today, she told presenter Vanessa Feltz how she was introduced as having slept with more than 20,000 men – a claim she never made to producers

Charlotte tweeted about her experience on the show after ITV axed it permanently following the suspected suicide of a former guest

Charlotte said they were then locked in the ITV studio room for up to two hours afterwards until Kyle had left the building.

She recalled: ‘They knew that if we’d seen him, we’d have approached him and said, “This is what we were told, what on earth was going on?”

‘We had all our phones taken away, we were separated so none of us could communicate with each other.’

Timeline of The Jeremy Kyle Show’s downfall

May 2: Steven Dymond fails a lie detector test when appearing on The Jeremy Kyle Show

May 9: Mr Dymond’s body is found at his flat in Portsmouth, and paramedics later say he has been dead for days

May 13: ITV pulls The Jeremy Kyle Show from its schedule and says it has been suspended indefinitely

May 14: Pressure mounts on ITV from MPs to cancel the show

May 15: ITV’s chief executive says the show has been axed for good

Outspoken Charlotte said after the ordeal she shied away from doing any interviews for six months.

‘It still affects me now talking about it, thinking what I actually went through, because nobody should have to go through that,’ she added. 

‘It wasn’t until after the show we actually found out from somebody we knew who was in the audience that they were purposely riled up, and the comment was, “This is the couple that we’re after, we want you to heckle them as much as you want”.’ 

After shooting, Charlotte said she contacted the Jeremy Kyle producers stating that she was lured to appear on the show under false pretences, and the episode was pulled from production and never aired.

She told Vanessa: ‘We threatened with solicitors, going to various different organisations – we were lucky in that sense. But I know a lot of other people didn’t have the opportunity to do so.’

FEMAIL has reached out to ITV and Jeremy Kyle for comment. 

The Jeremy Kyle show was axed permanently yesterday following the suspected suicide of grandfather Steven Dymond, 63, who failed a lie detector test while appearing on the programme.

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport Committee announced it will be launching an inquiry into the reality television programme a week after Steven Dymond, 63, was found dead at his home in Portsmouth after appearing on Jeremy Kyle

Charlotte said she and her partner Colin Chapman were locked in an ITV studio room for up to two hours until Kyle had left the building after shooting

Carolyn McCall, ITV’s chief executive, said: ‘Given the gravity of recent events we have decided to end production of The Jeremy Kyle Show.

‘The Jeremy Kyle Show has had a loyal audience and has been made by a dedicated production team for 14 years, but now is the right time for the show to end.

‘Everyone at ITV’s thoughts and sympathies are with the family and friends of Steve Dymond.’ 

The Department for Digital, Culture, Media & Sport Committee announced it will be launching an inquiry into reality television programmes a week after Dymond was found dead at his home in Portsmouth.

Charlotte, who began her career in the sex industry at the age of 17 and won Sex Worker of the Year in 2013 at the Sexual Freedom Awards, is a campaigner for sexual freedom

Earlier today Charlotte tweeted the host, admitting that despite their ‘horrific ordeal’ on Jeremy’s show, she and her partner don’t blame him personally

Charlotte said she believes cancelling the show was ‘definitely’ the right thing to do, adding that she was offered no aftercare following her appearance.

‘One of the biggest problems with this type of show is you’ve either got a winner or a loser,’ she said. 

‘There’s no real resolution between the show. So if somebody is not having that aftercare, this unfortunately is what happens.’

Earlier today she tweeted the host, admitting that despite their ‘horrific ordeal’ on Kyle’s show, she and her partner don’t blame him personally. 

Charlotte said she believes pulling the show was ‘definitely’ the right thing to do, adding that she was offered no aftercare following her appearance

‘It’s down to the the production team in my humble opinion,’ she wrote. 

‘I hope that you come out the other side of this swiftly and without too much personal trauma.’

Charlotte, who began her career in the sex industry at the age of 17 and won Sex Worker of the Year in 2013 at the Sexual Freedom Awards, is a campaigner for sexual freedom and often speaks out about the positivity that sex work can bring to society.

She once claimed to be the most expensive escort in South West England, charging £200 an hour, and is keen to become Britain’s number one sex guru.

What will the reality TV probe examine? 

The inquiry will consider production companies’ duty of care to participants, and ask whether enough support is offered both during and after filming, and whether there is a need for further regulatory oversight in this area.

To gather information, it will ask members of the public and experts to provide written evidence by 5pm on Thursday, June 13.

The five questions are:

What psychological support do production companies and broadcasters provide to participants in reality TV shows before, during and after the production process?

What are examples of best practice, and where is there room for improvement, in the support that is offered to reality TV participants?

Who should be responsible for monitoring whether duty of care policies are being applied effectively in the production of reality TV shows?

Do the design formats for reality shows put unfair psychological pressure on participants and encourage more extreme behaviour? If so, how?

What is for the future for reality TV of this kind? How does it accord with our understanding of, and evolving attitudes to, mental health?

Evidence can be submitted by clicking here.

 

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