Strangers offer to pay for picture with family's New Foundland dogs

Gentle giants! Family with two huge New Foundland dogs who have grown up alongside their young sons reveal strangers offer money to take pictures with their ‘big fluffy teddy bears’

  • Much-loved gentle giants Boss & Ralphie weigh 180lbs and 140lbs respectively 
  • Owners of the Newfoundlands been offered money for pictures with their pets
  •  Couple Josh and Bee Fisher, from South Carolina, say daily life is same as others
  • Have a ramp to get their bigger dog Boss in the car or father Josh, 41, lifts him in

A family say they are often approached by strangers asking to take pictures of their two enormous Newfoundland dogs, who stand taller on their hind legs than Tom Cruise. 

Gentle giants Boss and Ralphie dwarf their human owners Josh and Bee Fisher, from South Carolina, and weigh 180lbs and 140lbs respectively. 

Man’s beast friend: Owners of much-loved Newfoundland dogs Boss and Ralphie (pictured with Cruz, seven) Josh and Bee Fisher from South Carolina have been stopped and asked by strangers to take pictures with their pets 

The enormous dogs often garner lots of attention from members of the public who cannot believe how big they are in real-life. Pictured: Seven-year-old Cruz attempting to get Boss into the back of the family’s car

People are often drawn to the enormous animals, which stand taller on their hind legs than actor Tom Cruise. Pictured: Larger dog Boss wearing a pair of glasses while reading with five-year-old Tegan

Couple Josh and Bee Fisher got their first Newfoundland pooch Ralphie (right) five years ago to join their family and later added Boss (left) to the brood. Pictured: Bee and John, both 41, with sons Lennox, nine, (left) Cruz, seven, (right) and Tegan, five (centre)

The family have shared their home with their much-loved pets for the past five years and often get stopped by people who are amazed at the size of the canines.  

Registered nurse Bee, 41, said despite their size, people aren’t afraid of them and often gravitate toward them – which thinks is due their ‘fluffy teddy bear’ appearance. 

‘People ask to take pictures with them all the time and then we usually answer the same series of questions: How old are they, what kind of dog is it, do they shed, how big are their poops?’ she said. 

The couple have even made money off the back of people asking for pictures, with people insisting they pay for a snap with the dog while they were on a trip to New Orleans.  

The huge dogs weigh an enormous amount, with Boss (pictured) coming in at around 180lbs

The family share their home with the large dogs and owner Bee says, despite their size, people do not seem to be wary of the dogs. Pictured: The family pose for a family portrait, with the couple’s youngest son Tegan , five, donning a set of Easter bunny ears

Two drooling babies: The sweet dogs hearts are as big as their bodies and they are incredibly gentle with the younger members of the family. Pictured: Bigger dog Boss pictured with Tegan as a baby

When on trips and excursions the family will often be stopped by strangers and asked for photographs with their eye-catching pets. Pictured: The family wrapped up in their warm coats enjoying an outing with their  adored pets 

Josh and Bee’s children have grown up with the dogs and see them as their other furry brothers, despite being almost twice their size. Pictured: Boss and Ralphie with Cruz, seven 

And looking after the dogs is not always easy, dad Josh, also 41, has to lift the heavier pooch Boss into the car whenever they have to go anywhere. 

Bee said: ‘With a 40lbs weight difference, one can imagine that while Ralphie is very agile and can jump right in the car, Boss cannot. 

‘We have a ramp that I use when I’m alone with them but when we are altogether, Josh will lift Boss. And Boss knows the drill. 

Owner Bee thinks the dogs draw attention because of their ‘fluffy teddy bear’ appearance and they are often asked a series of questions about the breed when approached in the street. Pictured: Boss with Tegan, five

The pups appear to be unaware of their sheer size, attempting to sit on their owners laps and lounging around their home in South Carolina. Pictured: Ralphie and Boss with Bee and a Tegan when he was younger

Strangely, a common question the family gets asked when new people meet their dogs is ‘ How big are their poops?’. Pictured: Boss and Ralphie sat on the porch with youngest son Tegan, five 

Sitting next to Bee, the sheer size of the enormous dogs can be seen in all its glory in this wonderful image which dwarfs Bee

What you got there? The dogs have made themselves at home and even share the sofas with their owners, despite taking up most of the seat. Pictured: Ralphie looking curiously at a mobile phone in Lenox’s hand 

‘He raises his front paws up on the back of the car and then Josh lifts his hind legs and puts him in. 

‘All our boys want to be strong like daddy so every now and then they’ll attempt to lift Boss to see if they’re strong enough yet.

Daily life for the Fisher family is just the same as any other, except it also has to accommodate some big furry house guests. 

The couple have even made some extra money from the dogs, with people insisting they pay them money to get a snap with their dogs while on a trip in New Orleans. Pictured: Ralphie and Lenox, nine

If they want to go anywhere as a family and bring the dogs too, Josh, 41, has to lift bigger dog Boss (pictured) into the car as he struggles to haul himself in on his own

The couple’s youngest son Tegan has never known a life without the dogs, and the pooches are extremely gentle with their children. Pictured: Boss and Ralphie with Tegan as a baby

Despite how big they are, the sweet boys are so calm they are even able to be walked by the couple’s children, including their youngest Tegan, five (pictured)

The three boys all attempt to replicate their father hauling biggest dog Boss into the back of the family car. Pictured: Cruz hoping he is now strong enough to lift Boss

Bee said: ‘We hardly remember life without the two furry boys so daily life, we assume, is just like anyone else’s.’

But one fur baby in particular, Boss, makes his presence known, with his ‘extreme heavy breathing’ and huffing and puffing around the house.  

The mother of three said: ‘It’s usually because he’s hot or wants water. So, we let him out and then he usually will bark minutes later because he wants to come back in. He’s hot or he’s thirsty, that’s the story of his life. ‘

Older dog Ralphie is a little lighter and more agile than Boss which means he is able to get in and out of the car with ease, unlike his younger relative. Pictured: Ralphie and Cruz, seven, having fun in the sunshine

The dogs are so placid the family are even able to dress them up in costumes for themed photoshoots with the children. Pictured: Ralphie wearing a bonnet and Boss donning a suit with ears with youngest son Tegan as a baby

Despite dwarfing the family members, they take the dogs on lots of trips and outings, including this whitewater rafting trip. Pictured: Boss on a boat joined by owner Josh and sons Lenox, nine, and Cruz, seven 

Even though they have an two extra-large fur babies to look after, the couple say their daily lives are the same as everyone elses. Pictured: Tega, five, reading with Boss

One fur baby in particular, Boss, (pictured) makes his presence known, with his ‘extreme heavy breathing’ and huffing and puffing around the house

One issue the family face is housework, with the couple having to vacuum all the time to collect the animal’s fur and their ‘constant battle’ to maintain a drool free home.   

‘Some people wipe baseboards and walls when ‘spring cleaning’, we wipe them daily,’ Bee said. 

The dogs, which the family call ‘bears’, love to lounge around the house and often lay in front of the fridge meaning the family cannot get food out. 

The mother of three said Boss usually huffs and puffs because he’s hot or wants water: ‘That’s the story of his life.’ Pictured: Ralphie standing on his back legs looks like a brown bear

Bee says one difference between their lives and other people’s is their ‘constant battle’ to maintain a drool free home with their slobbery dogs. Pictured: The couple’s three sons and their two drooling fur babies

In order to keep their house as clean as possible, Bee says the family are constantly hoovering up to get rid of the hairs the fluffy dogs shed. Pictured: The whole brood on a family outing

Mother-of-three Bee says: ‘Some people wipe baseboards and walls when ‘spring cleaning’, we wipe them daily’. Pictured: Ralphie springs through the air showing just how big he is with Cruz, seven

They also have a habit of laying in front of the bathroom door while people are inside and trapping them in.   

Although they both have the same grandfather, a Newfoundland called Kong, Ralphie and Boss have very different personalities. 

Bee said: ‘Boss is flat out lazy. He wants to lay down every chance he gets. Ralphie is the opposite, he’s full of energy. He’s a licker and loves attention. 

In order to get Boss in the car when her husband is not there, Bee bought a ramp to help the enormous dog haul himself into the back. Pictured: Seven-year-old Cruz trying to get the Boss in the car

The dogs, which the family call ‘bears’, love to lounge around the house and often lay in front of the fridge meaning the family cannot get food out. Pictured: Boss playing around with five-year-old Tegan

On occasions the dogs have been known to lie in front of the bathroom door while people were inside, meaning they could not get out until they decided to move. Pictured: John, 41, with Ralphie

Bee says despite coming from the same family, Ralphie and Boss have very different personalities. Pictured: Ralphie leaping through the air with seven-year-old Cruz

The much-adored pets come from the same family and have the same grandfather, a Newfoundland pup called Kong

‘Ralphie is what is known as a ‘Velcro Newfie’, always stuck at your side. If we do much as say Ralphie’s name, his tails begins to wag. 

‘You have to call Boss three or four times and he might look in your direction, if he feels like it. But if you have treats, he’s there.’ 

The couple’s eldest son Lenox was four-and-a-half when they got their first dog Ralphie and five when they brought Boss home. 

Boss is a lot more lazy than Ralphie and often wants to lay down every chance he gets whereas Ralphie is full of energy and loves attention. Pictured: The dogs with Cruz, seven

The doting dog-mum said: ‘Cruz had just turned two when we got Ralphie and a few months shy of three when Boss came. 

‘And Tegan, he’s never known anything else than to have two furry big brothers. 

‘They all adore Ralphie and Boss. Cruz is in charge of feeding them and giving them water and he does it without even being asked.’

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