Succession series 3: Reviews from critics and fans say it's a hit

Succession is back with a bang! TV critics and fans hail ‘immaculate’ writing and ‘unimpeachable’ performances in five-star reviews in the US and UK

  • SPOILER ALERT 
  • Succession season 3 premiered simultaneously at 9pm (EST) Sunday in the US and at 2am Monday on Sky Atlantic in the UK, with a repeat airing tonight at 9pm
  • Has received a slew of five-star reviews from critics on both sides of the Atlantic
  • Viewers are equally thrilled and have hailed it the ‘best drama on televsision’
  • Season 3 picks up following Kendall’s mutinous strike at the end of series 2

It is one of the most hotly anticipated TV events of the year – and the Succession series 3 premiere does not disappoint, according to rave reviews from viewers and critics. 

The critically-acclaimed drama returned to the US at 9pm on Sunday night, in what fans dubbed ‘Succession Sunday’, while committed British viewers set their alarms for 2am to watch the premiere simultaneously on Sky Atlantic. 

The episode, which receives its primetime UK premiere on Sky Atlantic at 9pm tonight, is now available to stream via HBO Max in the US, and NowTV and Sky in the UK. 

Season 3 deals with the aftermath of the explosive end of season 2, when Kendall Roy (Jeremy Strong) knifed his father Logan (Brian Cox) in the back by publicly declaring his involvement in various scandals.

The family is still reeling from the mutinous strike, while Logan is trying to work out who he can trust to take temporary charge of the business as he flees overseas. 

As MailOnline’s TV critic Christopher Stevens writes in his five-star review: ‘Logan’s four children and the other characters – wives and ex-wives, rivals, henchmen – circle him like anxious jackals and vultures gathering to fight for scraps around a lion gorging on its prey.’

Succession returned to the US at 9pm on Sunday night, in what fans dubbed ‘Succession Sunday’, while committed British viewers set their alarms for 2am to watch the premiere simultaneously on Sky Atlantic. It will air again on Sky Atlantic at 9pm tonight

The razor-sharp return has been praised by TV critics and fans on both sides of the Atlantic, with CNN (top), the Daily Telegraph (middle) and the Guardian all giving it rave reviews

The razor-sharp return has been widely praised by TV critics on both sides of the Atlantic, with The Daily Telegraph, The Times and the Guardian hailing the ‘immaculate’ writing and ‘unimpeachable’ performances in five-star reviews. 

CNN critic Brian Lowry writes: ‘Success hasn’t spoiled “Succession,” as the Emmy-winning drama returns with all its Shakespearean and Murdochian overtones intact, with a bruising father-son battle over its fictional media empire’. 

Philippa Snow of the Independent adds: ‘After a terrible year, full of struggle and calamity and sickness, it is somehow still a pleasure to spend time with some of the worst and most narcissistic people ever written.’

The enthusiasm is echoed on social media by viewers who say the show is only ‘getting better and better’. The theme tune alone was enough to send some into a spin, with several posting memes to reflect their excitement. 

One tweeted: ‘#Succession is such a thrill ride. Superb writing. And Sarah Snook is one of the best actors at playing several subtexts at once. Just an edge of your seat ensemble.’

Another wrote: ‘So…that was one of the best season premieres I’ve ever seen. #Succession.’

The enthusiasm is echoed on social media by viewers who say the show is only ‘getting better and better’. Some UK fans even set their alarms to watch Succession at 2am (above)

A third raved: ‘The dialogue in Succession just makes me so happy. Good writing, great acting and direction makes it one of the best shows ever. #Succession.’ 

Only a handful of reviews were lukewarm, including the one from Vanity Fair’s Cassie da Costa, who wrote: ‘Succession is often very funny, and always extremely bleak. But the show’s window-dressing doesn’t deliver the same vicarious thrill.’

Nina Metz from the Chicago Tribune had her own issues with the show, writing in her review: ‘My issue with “Succession” (and I have a few) is that it has noticeably little to offer beyond these aesthetic qualities. It is a gorgeously made box with nothing inside.’

Here, FEMAIL shares a selection of the best – and worst – reviews of Succession, so you can make up your mind whether it is worth tuning in to watch.  

Scroll down to read the full five-star review by MailOnline’s Christopher Stevens

Season 3 deals with the aftermath of the explosive end of season 2, when Kendall Roy (Jeremy Strong) knifed his father Logan (Brian Cox) in the back by publicly declaring his involvement in various scandals. Pictured, Logan in Succession series 3 

THE GOOD REVIEWS  

THE TIMES 

Rating:

 

Carol Midgely writes: ‘Once the foundations are laid… Succession, which aired in the US yesterday, is back in top gear. “Do you want me to ride with you, Dad?” Roman asks his father. “Do you wanna suck my d***?” comes fond pater’s reply. Ah, it’s good to have them back.

SUCCESSION IS A SUCCESS! EVEN MORE RAVE REVIEWS…

 TVGUIDE 

Rating:

‘I was nervous these new episodes would simply never be able to live up to the hype the HBO dramedy’s passionate fanbase has created around it. I’m happy to say I was wrong.’

ROLLING STONE 

Rating:

‘I will occasionally still ask myself why I’m watching these bad people bringing naught but destruction to those around them, but in the same way I occasionally felt about, say, The Sopranos, a show I otherwise adored.

NME

Rating:

‘What Succession has always managed to do frighteningly well is make each of its main characters so believable and so dense that every scene is as layered as a lasagne palace.’

EMPIRE

Rating:

‘The episodes are built around a series of astonishingly thrilling clashes, as everyone involved scrambles to take sides and work out what’s best for them, in a constantly shifting landscape.’  

ENTERTAINMENT DAILY 

Rating:

‘Succession season 3 is one of those shows that has no right to be as good as it is. And it just keeps getting better.’

 

‘As I wrote in a preview recently, although the first half of episode one is of a lower octane there is no drop in quality; it is as much a toxic joy as ever and is still better when firing on four cylinders than most dramas are on six. 

‘I recommend watching episode one twice as it’s so rich that you might miss little tics and asides the first time. And be assured: by episodes two and three the show is on fire, Roman dialling up the funniness and still lusting after Gerri, his bespectacled Oedipal mum crush…

‘Succession’s strength is in having no weak links, with even the snakey old “yes men” at Logan’s side perfectly drawn.’

THE DAILY TELEGRAPH

Rating:

Anita Singh writes: ‘Some shows punch above their weight. Succession cleaned up at the Emmys last year: outstanding drama, best lead actor, best direction, writing and casting. Yet most people have never seen it. Here, where it’s shown on Sky Atlantic, the first series averaged 150,000 viewers. In the US, where it can be found on HBO, the second series concluded with 1.1 million. In ratings terms, it’s a minnow.

‘But it deserves all those accolades. Simply, it’s terrific. I still marvel at how Jesse Armstrong, the writer who perfectly captured the lives of two losers in a Croydon flat in Peep Show, has also created this show, set in the rarefied world of billionaires, and made it seem equally authentic. The two do have something in common: every line of dialogue is a gem…

‘What makes the show stand apart from, say, Billions – another series about the ruthless mega-rich – is the humour. It is bitingly funny, whether through the idiocy of Greg (“You’re the number one trending topic ahead of Tater Tots, and the Pope followed you! Oh… I don’t think this is the real Pope”) or the caustic wit of Roman (Kieran Culkin).’ 

GUARDIAN

Rating:

Lucy Mangan writes: ‘Succession is back for its third season and it doesn’t miss a beat. We pick up right where fans hoped we would – in the immediate aftermath of Kendall’s denunciation of his father Logan live on national television. He is still high on events. Even for one used to the highest grade cocaine (except of course when Greg is put in charge of supply), it turns but that there is no buzz like patricide…

‘The writing – though there is in the particularly plot-heavy, season-setting opener less room for the delicate characterisation that customarily leaven the script and make you wring your hands with their deftness and intelligence – remains immaculate. The performances – and let’s just make a little corner of appreciation here for Matthew Macfadyen as Tom Wambsgans, a man so needy, so appalling and so entirely credible that the mere sight of him makes you want to fling both him and yourself off the nearest Royscraper – remain unimpeachable.

‘In the unlikely event that Succession’s devoted fans ever doubted him, they will be able to breathe a sigh of relief within minutes knowing that creator Jesse Armstrong has lost none of his mastery of the Roys and their world. Their appetites, their weaknesses, their multitudinous depths are all still there. All the pieces are still in play. It’s just that Kendall’s changed the game.’ 

THE INDEPENDENT

Rating:

Philippa Snow writes: ‘After a terrible year, full of struggle and calamity and sickness, it is somehow still a pleasure to spend time with some of the worst and most narcissistic people ever written. 

‘The Roy siblings – a squabbling nest of vipers with a net worth of what must be tens of billions of dollars – have been jostling for position as the primary object of their brutal father’s love for the entire run of Succession, failing largely because Logan (Brian Cox) does not appear to be capable of feeling love at all. In light of this, each of them is willing to settle for his money, or his job. The show is funny, elegant and pleasurable precisely because there is no hope of an actual happy ending for its bratty, spatting leads…

‘If the mood of the show’s first two seasons tended to reflect that of its upstart children – jittery, tricksy, caustic, sly – the third begins in the hot-tempered tenor of its father-figure: violence, there is no doubt, is afoot.’   

VARIETY

Daniel D’Aaddario writes: ‘The end of the second season radically clarified the series’ vision. Though the relationship between patriarch Logan (Brian Cox) and son Kendall (Jeremy Strong) had long been a central concern, their bipolar power struggle over the future of the family company felt less reinvigorated than reimagined at season’s end. And in the first seven of nine episodes of Season 3 — perhaps the show’s most sharply observed run so far — “Succession” probes the contours of its new reality…

‘The episode dealing with the political race will, and should, generate much discussion once it airs. But does it come as any surprise that it’s Siobhan — the family member who believed that minds could be changed through the soft power of finesse — who ends up losing? This transcends the easy comparison to Ivanka Trump flunking out as a White House moderating force (though that’s certainly in there): It makes for the show’s most confrontational statement yet about what drives the powerful. 

‘Despite the motivations of Siobhan, Roman and Kendall, respectively, what matters here is not good works, material gratification or love (synthetic or real). The true elite still live for the simple thrill of killing. And much of the way through a glimmeringly brutal season, the greatest challenge “Succession” has posed for itself is, once again, pulling insight and enjoyment out of staring into the heart of darkness.’

THE WASHINGTON POST 

 Season 3 keeps a tight focus on the aftermath of Kendall Roy’s (Jeremy Strong), pictured, mutiny. The family is split, making them more vulnerable to themselves and the outside

Inkoo Kang writes: ‘”Succession” isn’t exactly about the Murdochs and Fox News, but upcoming episodes do make pointed references to Rupert et al.’s truce with Donald Trump, while convincingly dramatizing how a conservative cable news network like Waystar’s ATN might arrange quid pro quos with the White House — particularly one whose Department of Justice is on the verge of investigating Logan for his role in the cruise-line scandal… 

‘Season 3 often feels like a clenched fist: There’s a compressed, almost uncomfortably tight focus on the aftermath of Kendall’s mutiny, and it keeps punching its characters hard. Their new vulnerability refreshingly opens them up to the possibility of consequences, but it’s revealing that the only people who can mobilize a real threat to the Roys are each other.

‘However grave their sins, however much they burn down the world and wait for things the ruins to cool, no one can truly get to them but one of their own.’

CNN

Brian Lowry writes: ‘Success hasn’t spoiled “Succession,” as the Emmy-winning drama returns with all its Shakespearean and Murdochian overtones intact, with a bruising father-son battle over its fictional media empire. Stripped of that, the HBO series remains enormously fun, filled with cringe-inducing moments and the kind of vicious insults that would make the writers of “Veep” blush… 

‘Perhaps most impressively, the new episodes set up plenty of tests for all of the Roys (and thus splendid showcases for the cast), including daughter Shiv (Sarah Snook) and son Roman (Kieran Culkin). Indeed, just the promise of being named a figurehead CEO — as Logan contemplates stepping more into the shadows — sets off a dizzying whirlwind of shifting alliances even by “Succession” brutal standards…

‘As with “Veep,” much of the dialogue is gleefully vulgar, and the episodes get better and better as the season progresses, from the backstage maneuvering at a shareholders meeting to an insanely over-the-top birthday party.’

… AND THE BAD 

CHICAGO TRIBUNE 

At the start of the series, the family is still reeling from Kendall’s mutinous strike, while Logan is trying to work out who he can trust between Shiv and Roman (pictured) to take temporary charge of the business as he flees overseas.

Nina Metz writes: ‘I admire HBO’s “Succession” enormously, let’s get that out of the way. It’s exceedingly well-made, visually specific and brilliantly cast with an incredible musical score. And if you are powerless to resist the vicarious thrill of being inside these exclusive spaces that the show occupies — the private planes and penthouse apartments and luxury suites — well, there’s nothing wrong with that. 

‘My issue with “Succession” (and I have a few) is that it has noticeably little to offer beyond these aesthetic qualities. It is a gorgeously made box with nothing inside. 

‘Shouldn’t we want more from this portrait of a modern day robber baron grasping at the dying light of his reign as his blundering offspring clamber for position and a pat on the head? “Succession” isn’t glamorizing the brutal elitists of the world — there’s no mistaking showrunner Jesse Armstrong’s jabs; these are deeply unhappy people! — and of course they would be oblivious to the harm their petty, ego-driven actions have on anyone lower on the food chain. But the show mirrors that disinterest as well, and that’s what leaves me feeling so empty episode after episode.’ 

VANITY FAIR 

Cassie da Costa writes: ‘Succession is often very funny, and always extremely bleak. But the show’s window-dressing doesn’t deliver the same vicarious thrill anymore. In seasons one and two, it was still fun to see how the uber-wealthy live—donning impeccable threads, surrounded by the finest amenities, and situated in enviable locales. The show’s vicious familial discord struck a fruitful contrast with its almost ruthlessly tasteful aesthetics. 

‘By season three, the banality of luxury has sufficiently sunk in. These people want for nothing materially, and yet so desperately want more of what they have. It’s not impressive; it’s sad. The show knows this; we know it; even Roman (Kieran Culkin, playing the youngest Roy with as odious a sneer as ever) knows it. So, yeah, you could say we get it…

‘Some of the problem is inherent to the TV form itself, of course. With the exception of limited series, the medium often pushes stories well beyond their viability. Still, it’s not hard to imagine the curveballs the show could have thrown to an audience already primed to accept anything that came under the title Succession.’ 

Logan’s run goes on… and even the President isn’t safe from his fury – CHRISTOPHER STEVENS reviews the opening to the third season 

Welcome back to the Logan Roy Show. The vicious, bullying, billionaire mogul, that monstrous thug controlling a global media empire, has completed a hostile takeover of his own TV serial.

Despite a Senate probe into his odious business practices and two attempts by his son to oust him, as well as a near-fatal stroke, Logan remains the towering force at the centre of Succession (Sky Atlantic).

His four children and the other characters – wives and ex-wives, rivals, henchmen – circle him like anxious jackals and vultures gathering to fight for scraps around a lion gorging on its prey.

This was not how Succession was meant to pan out. As actor Brian Cox revealed in the Daily Mail on Saturday, when he signed up he expected that his character would be written out after the first year.

The clue is in the title. All the emphasis was originally meant to be on the internecine warfare of the siblings – emotionally-damaged Kendall (Jeremy Strong), conflicted Shiv (Sarah Snook), feral Roman (Kieran Culkin) and fruit loop Connor (Alan Ruck). But the spectacle of Logan’s volcanic anger is too mesmeric for his creators to allow him to fade.

Every time we think he has burned out, the red-hot lava erupts again.

At one point as the third series begins – in an episode aired here at 2am this morning, simultaneously with the US screening, and repeated in the UK tonight – the ageing boss appears befuddled.

He’s mislaid his phone. He is quiet, distant, almost vacant. Shiv and Roman watch him from across the room, out of the corner of their eyes, whispering: ‘He’s toast. Is he toast?’

And then, with a snarl, he’s awake and in control, and those rebellious children are scrambling to serve him like waiters bringing room service to a tyrannical guest.

In a show renowned for its lacerating and occasionally shocking dialogue, where the cast are encouraged to shoot half a dozen versions of scenes with different sweary put-downs, Logan has all the most quotable lines. Phoning Kendall, who has just appeared before the world’s cameras to denounce his father for covering up rape and murder, the old man finds himself talking to a secretary.

She asks if she can take a message. ‘Tell him,’ Logan growls, ‘I’m going to grind his f*****g bones to make my bread.’ He’s a fairytale ogre and he’s relishing every filthy mouthful. Cox has a simple technique to heighten the drama. Like a child twiddling the volume control, he surges from a whisper to a bellow and back again, almost as often as he draws breath.

When a desperate executive asks if they can stop moving long enough to eat, Logan asks quietly: ‘Food?’ And then he roars: ‘Swallow! We’re on saliva and adrenaline here.’

Even the US President isn’t safe from this fury. After the leader of the Western World side-steps a phone call, Logan refuses to talk to anyone else at the White House: ‘I don’t speak to the babysitter!’ Small wonder his children are nervous wrecks. The new series opens with Kendall in a New York bathroom, shaking with fear at his own audacity in betraying his father. To calm himself, he curls up in the bathtub in a foetal ball. Jeremy Strong’s portrayal of mental disintegration is the most disturbing element in the show.

Logan is half-way around the world, flying over the Balkans with a pair of helicopters that swoop and cross each other’s paths in an aerial ballet. When they land, his senior executives stagger out on to the tarmac, both air sick and shellshocked by their boss’s seismic mood swings.

The most devious of them, Frank the lawyer (Peter Friedman), sums up the flight: ‘I got fired, he got fired, she got promoted, I got rehired, she got demoted.’ That’s the whole story. No one ever wins or loses for long because Logan is playing them all against each other, spinning them like plates.

You could skip half a dozen episodes and pick up the story almost where you left it – except that you’d miss so many subtle shifts of allegiance. One character stands slightly outside the frenzy. Dimwit nephew Greg (Nicholas Braun) is happy just to get through the day without being savaged, though he has no clue how to achieve this.

There’s a hilarious scene on a New York street with Kendall surrounded by baying TV reporters, and Greg struggling behind him. He’s clearly been told to say nothing to the Press because he’s yelling: ‘No comment! No comment!’ like he’s trying to hail a taxi in an alien language. Ever since we first met Greg, bumbling around one of his family’s theme parks in a cartoon costume, he has been a lamb among the wolves, protected by his own innocence – but for how long?

Perhaps his destiny echoes that of the helpless young Bran Stark in Game Of Thrones … to be ignored by the warring factions, until finally he is crowned king.

The other characters are too busy fighting each other to see him. They’re so intent on their enemies they don’t dare allow their concentration to slip for a moment. They all know Logan will never relinquish power as long as he has a pulse, but they’re addicted to the drama of it – just as we are.

Succession Season 3 premiere: The Roy family are at WAR as Logan and Kendall go up against each other in a bitter and bloodthirsty battle while the company WayCorp is in shambles

    By Brian Gallagher for DailyMail.com 

    The Roy family and their WayCorp conglomerate were left in shambles during the Season Three premiere of Succession, as the show made a dark and twisted return after Kendall Roy (Jeremy Strong) dropped a bombshell in the Season Two finale, exposing his father Logan (Brian Cox) as complicit in sexual abuse and other allegations.

    After the episode aired on HBO on Sunday, fans and critics were left agog having witnessed Logan and Kendall go up against each other in a bitter and bloodthirsty battle.

    As Season Three begins, both Kendall and his legendary father struggle to find their footing as a the Roy family wages civil war on each other. 

    The episode begins with Logan in a helicopter circling some mountains as they land in a wooded retreat, meanwhile Kendall is seen trying to calm himself down in a bathroom while Greg (Nicholas Braun) waits for them.

    Logan lands with the rest of his team and his family, with Gerri (J. Smith-Cameron) revealing that Logan spent a lot of time on the helicopter ride talking about his mother.

    Greg asks Kendall if he’s OK and he comes out and talks about ‘action stations’ and has them ‘get into this’ as the title sequence rolls.

    The episode, written by series creator Jesse Armstrong and directed by Mark Mylod, continues with Kendall starting to lay out his strategy to Greg and Jess (Juliana Canfield).

    Jess adds that they are in a company vehicle, but notes he probably doesn’t work for the company anymore after his bombshell announcement in the Season Two finale.

    Tub: Kendall is seen trying to calm himself down in a bathroom while Greg (Nicholas Braun) waits for them

    Gerri: Logan lands with the rest of his team and his family, with Gerri (J. Smith-Cameron) revealing that Logan spent a lot of time on the helicopter ride talking about his mother

    Action stations: Greg asks Kendall if he’s OK and he comes out and talks about ‘action stations’ and has them ‘get into this’ as the title sequence rolls

    Shiv (Sarah Snook) and Roman (Kieran Culkin) are with their father’s team and watching footage of Kendall, as Roman asks Shiv what she thinks of all this.

    While Shiv says she thinks they should back dad… what she’s really thinking is he’s toast.

    Hugo (Fisher Stevens) tries to figure out a strategy when Logan asks the kids if they knew Kendall was going to do that.

    Company: Jess adds that they are in a company vehicle, adding he probably doesn’t work for the company anymore after his bombshell announcement in the Season 2 finale

    Shiv and Roman: Shiv (Sarah Snook) and Roman (Kieran Culkin) are with their father’s team and watching footage of Kendall, as Roman asks Shiv what she thinks of all this

    Toast: Hugo (Fisher Stevens) tries to figure out a strategy when Logan asks the kids if they knew Kendall was going to do that.

    Roman adds Kendall is ‘mentally insane’ as Logan asks where his phone is.

    Kendall is driving as Jess answers a call from Logan as they trade barbs through Jess, with Kendall telling him to step aside to avoid jail time.

    Logan tells the team that he gave Kendall a chance, as Gerri suggests calling the Department of Justice, as Logan asks if they cooperate with the government. 

    Mentally insane: Roman adds Kendall is ‘mentally insane’ as Logan asks where his phone is

    Jess: Kendall is driving as Jess answers a call from Logan as they trade barbs through Jess, with Kendall telling him to step aside to avoid jail time

    Gerri says they don’t know what they have so they have to play ball as Roman suggests destroying Kendall.

    Logan wonders if they admit wrongdoing there are ‘billions out the door,’ with Logan suggesting they get the President.

    Greg tells Kendall that he is the ‘number one trending topic on Twitter’ and that the Pope followed him… but it doesn’t seem to be the real pope.

    Gerri: Gerri says they don’t know what they have so they have to play ball as Roman suggests destroying Kendall

    Billions: Logan wonders if they admit wrongdoing there are ‘billions out the door,’ with Logan suggesting they get the President

    Trending: Greg tells Kendall that he is the ‘number one trending topic on Twitter’ and that the Pope followed him… but it doesn’t seem to be the real pope

    Kendall calls Frank (Peter Friedman) telling him that there is a place for him at the company he’s going to be running.

    Gerri tells Logan that the President is supportive, and tells the President’s person that he’s not asking for favors.

    She asks if there any danger of the government going after them but it’s unclear.

    Frank: Kendall calls Frank (Peter Friedman) telling him that there is a place for him at the company he’s going to be running

    They get to the airfield as Kendall calls Shiv but she doesn’t say anything as Greg tells Kendall that the internet traffic is ‘positive.’

    Jess tells him that they’re trying to cancel his access as Greg says this is just like OJ except for for not killing anybody.

    Logan asks for a lawyer and Gerri suggests Lisa Arthur, who is played by new cast member Sanaa Lathan.

    Call: They get to the airfield as Kendall calls Shiv but she doesn’t say anything as Greg tells Kendall that the internet traffic is ‘positive’

    Cancel: Jess tells him that they’re trying to cancel his access as Greg says this is just like OJ except for for not killing anybody

    Logan sends Shiv, Logan and Gerri back to New York and asks Conner to ‘hold down the fort’ so to speak.

    Conner tells his girlfriend Willa (Julia Lupe) about exploiting the ‘hate-watch’ angle of her play which could be lucrative.

    It seems that Shiv and Tom (Matthew McFadyen) are still working through their marital issues after a tense conversation on the airfield.

    Sent: Logan sends Shiv, Logan and Gerri back to New York and asks Conner to ‘hold down the fort’ so to speak

    Hate-watch: Conner tells his girlfriend Willa (Julia Lupe) about exploiting the ‘hate-watch’ angle of her play which could be lucrative

    Tense: It seems that Shiv and Tom (Matthew McFadyen) are still working through their marital issues after a tense conversation on the airfield

    Tom revealed in the Season 2 finale that he has been ‘unhappy’ with her for some time because she said on their wedding day that she wanted an open relationship.

    Kendall goes to visit Rava (Natalie Gold) asking if they can use her home as a base of sorts for now, since he’s out of options.

    They talk about how he ‘really did it,’ meaning he went after his dad, with Kendall saying the press are swarming him and he needs a ‘hidey hole’ for now.

    Open: Tom revealed in the Season 2 finale that he has been ‘unhappy’ with her for some time because she said on their wedding day that she wanted an open relationship

    Rava: Kendall goes to visit Rava (Natalie Gold) asking if they can use her home as a base of sorts for now, since he’s out of options

    Hidey hole: They talk about how he ‘really did it,’ meaning he went after his dad, with Kendall saying the press are swarming him and he needs a ‘hidey hole’ for now

    She admits that she hasn’t watched the video but people are saying good things and he says she should watch it.

    In another twist, Kendall says he’s going after Lisa Arthur – the same lawyer that Logan is going after.

    Logan meets with his team on the plane and reveals he will step back ass CEO, but he still expects to have input.

    Good things: She admits that she hasn’t watched the video but people are saying good things and he says she should watch it

    Step back: Logan meets with his team on the plane and reveals he will step back ass CEO, but he still expects to have input

    He says he doesn’t give a f**k who is named as the temporary CEO, as Karl suggests himself, which Frank thinks is hilarious.

    Logan thinks Frank isn’t to be trusted, with Logan suggesting Roman or Gerri, as Tom goes to the bathroom and calls Shiv.

    He asks if she wants CEO and she says she does, telling Tom to ‘hustle’ for her so she can get it.

    CEO: He says he doesn’t give a f**k who is named as the temporary CEO, as Karl suggests himself, which Frank thinks is hilarious

    No trust: Logan thinks Frank isn’t to be trusted, with Logan suggesting Roman or Gerri, as Tom goes to the bathroom and calls Shiv

    Hustle: He asks if she wants CEO and she says she does, telling Tom to ‘hustle’ for her so she can get it.

    Gerri says Frank called her and says there are a number of candidates being talked about.

    Greg tells the new media monitors that his mother (Mary Birdsong) was cut off after Kendall made his announcement.

    They think he’s going to win this thing, and they like winners.

    Media: Greg tells the new media monitors that his mother (Mary Birdsong) was cut off after Kendall made his announcement

    Winner: They think he’s going to win this thing, and they like winners

    Logan arrives in Sarajevo where he asks Frank if Gerri is clean, as Tom chimes in and says he likes her and Roman, but Logan says what about him.

    He thinks the job is ‘too rich’ as Logan makes it clear that whoever he names, Logan will still be pulling the strings.

    Roman calls Logan and he says he thinks the job should be his, adding, ‘I want it and I think he can do it.’

    Sarajevo: Logan arrives in Sarajevo where he asks Frank if Gerri is clean, as Tom chimes in and says he likes her and Roman, but Logan says what about him 

    Job: Roman calls Logan and he says he thinks the job should be his, adding, ‘I want it and I think he can do it’

    ‘I think it should be me, but if you don’t think I’m ready, which I would understand, maybe a couple of years under the wing under an older hen could see me break out of the egg,’ Roman says.

    He also suggests Gerri for the job and makes it clear that he does want the top job.

    When Logan hangs up the phone, Logan immediately says, ‘Roman is out.’

    Not ready: ‘I think it should be me, but if you don’t think I’m ready, which I would understand, maybe a couple of years under the wing under an older hen could see me break out of the egg,’ Roman says

    Out: When Logan hangs up the phone, Logan immediately says, ‘Roman is out’

    Logan calls Shiv, though their conversation is not heard, but Shiv reveals he named her as CEO.

    Shiv goes to meet with Lisa the lawyer, who says she can’t act for her dad, but Shiv says she wants to talk about something else.

    She says she could use a friend with legal training to find herself navigating her new position, but Lisa says that’s not what she does.

    New CEO: Logan calls Shiv, though their conversation is not heard, but Shiv reveals he named her as CEO

    Lawyer Lisa: Shiv goes to meet with Lisa the lawyer, who says she can’t act for her dad, but Shiv says she wants to talk about something else

    Friend: She says she could use a friend with legal training to find herself navigating her new position, but Lisa says that’s not what she does

    Shiv gives her a pitch and Lisa stops her saying she can’t give advice and she shouldn’t give her any confidential information… ultimately revealing she’s working with Kendall.

    Roman finds himself in the hotel with Gerri and starts flirting with her again, telling her no one would know, but she gets a call from Logan.

    Gerri tells Logan that she’s CEO because Shiv blew it with Lisa, as Roman congratulates her.

    No: Shiv gives her a pitch and Lisa stops her saying she can’t give advice and she shouldn’t give her any confidential information… ultimately revealing she’s working with Kendall

    Roman: Roman finds himself in the hotel with Gerri and starts flirting with her again, telling her no one would know, but she gets a call from Logan

    New CEO: Gerri tells Logan that she’s CEO because Shiv blew it with Lisa, as Roman congratulates her.

    Logan calls Shiv that she’s out as CEO and she tells her driver there has been a change of plan and they turn around.

    Kendall talks with Rava as Lisa and Keith arrive along with his new girlfriend Naomi (Annabelle Dexter-Jones).

    Kendall tells Lisa that his dad has gone to Sarajevo, with Kendall saying his dad runs a crime ring, but Lisa isn’t sure.

    New CEO: Logan calls Shiv that she’s out as CEO and she tells her driver there has been a change of plan and they turn around

    Girlfriend: Kendall talks with Rava as Lisa and Keith arrive along with his new girlfriend Naomi (Annabelle Dexter-Jones)

    She asks if the government has reached out for the documents as Rava gets mad about Greg opening a bottle of women.

    Back in Logan’s war room Logan is getting agitated when Kendall calls him, but he hands the call to Frank.

    Frank says it’s not a big deal but he tells him them that Lisa is going to represent Kendall, as Logan says, ‘We’ll f***ing beast them. We’ll go full f***ing beast’ as the episode comes to an end.

    Mad: She asks if the government has reached out for the documents as Rava gets mad about Greg opening a bottle of women

    The preview for next week’s episode reveals Kendall telling Logan that he’s a better man as Kendall reunites with his siblings with an explosive confrontation.

    Season 2 ended with the Roy family heading into a proxy battle after Logan failed to secure funding to take the company private. 

    Logan decided to announce a clean-up with Kendall taking the fall for the massive sexual abuse scandal that happened on the family’s cruise lines.

    Kendall threw everyone a major curveball, though, revealing at the press conference that his father knew everything and orchestrated the millions of dollars in payouts to the victims to keep  everything quiet.

    Beast: The preview for next week’s episode reveals Kendall telling Logan that he’s a better man as Kendall reunites with his siblings with an explosive confrontation

    Clean-up: Logan decided to announce a clean-up with Kendall taking the fall for the massive sexual abuse scandal that happened on the family’s cruise lines

    This new season will find Logan trying to secure familial and political allies in the aftermath of Kendall’s bombshell announcement. 

    The trailers have teased that the family has been divided with most abandoning Logan, as they near the pivotal shareholder’s meeting where the family could lose the company to Stewy (Arian Moayed) and Sandy Furness (Larry Pine).

    Kendall reveals in one of the trailers that he wants to take down his father, but he also doesn’t want the family to lose control of the company.

    Logan: This new season will find Logan trying to secure familial and political allies in the aftermath of Kendall’s bombshell announcement

    There will also be a few new characters thrown into the mix this season, played by Adrien Brody, Alexander Skarsgard and Hope Davis.

    Brody will portray Josh Aaronson, described as, ‘a billionaire activist investor who becomes pivotal in the battle for the ownership of Waystar.’

    Skarsgard plays Lukas Matsson, described as a, ‘successful, confrontational tech founder and CEO.’

    New: Brody will portray Josh Aaronson, described as, ‘a billionaire activist investor who becomes pivotal in the battle for the ownership of Waystar’

    New season: The nine-episode Season 3 of Succession will air Sunday nights at 9 PM ET on HBO

    Davis plays Sandi Furness, the daughter of Logan Roy’s longtime rival Sandy Furness.

    Other new characters include Sanaa Lathan as Lisa Arthur, ‘a high profile well-connected New York lawyer,’ Linda Emond as Michelle-Anne Vanderhoven, ‘a senior White House aide,’ and Jihae Kim as Berry Schneider, ‘a leading Public Relations consultant,’ all in recurring roles.

    The nine-episode Season 3 of Succession will air Sunday nights at 9 PM ET on HBO. 

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