Abandoned Camelot theme park demolished after falling into disrepair

End of the ride: Abandoned Camelot theme park is demolished after falling into disrepair following closure in 2012

  • Camelot Theme Park in Chorley, Lancashire, has been boarded up since it was shut down in 2012 
  • Amusement park was home to the legendary Knightmare rollercoaster –  which stayed standing after closure
  • Since its closure it has only attracted urban explorers keen to wander around the eerie ruins of a theme park 

An abandoned theme park has today been demolished after falling into disrepair since it closed in 2012. 

Camelot Theme Park in Chorley, Lancashire, opened in 1983 and was named after the castle associated with King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table. 

The amusement park was home to the legendary Knightmare rollercoaster – the structure of which remained standing tall even after it was shut down and was only dismantled in February this year. 

Other famous rides at the medieval-themed park included the Dragon Flyer, Caterpillar Capers, The Galleon and Pendragon’s Plunge. 

Demolition is now well underway and bulldozers can be spotted littered throughout the theme park.  

Camelot Theme Park in Chorley, Lancashire, opened in 1983 and was named after the castle associated with King Arthur and the Knights of the Round Table

The amusement park was home to the legendary Knightmare rollercoaster – the structure of which remained standing tall even after it was shut down and was only dismantled in February this year

Other famous rides at the medieval-themed park included the Dragon Flyer, Caterpillar Capers, The Galleon and Pendragon’s Plunge. Demolition is now well underway and bulldozers can be spotted littered throughout the theme park

Organisers would also perform jousting events in the theme park’s arena and do magic shows.  

And an episode of the famous children’s TV show Sooty & Co was even filmed at the theme park in 1994.  

When the owners closed the theme park after 29 years they blamed large public events such as the Olympics for a decline in visitors.  

Since its closure it has only attracted urban explorers keen to wander around the eerie ruins of a theme park. 

There have also been reports of people stealing scrap metal from the park including copper wire and graffiti covers the old buildings that remain.  

At its peak Camelot Theme Park was one of the North West’s most popular attractions with dozens of rides and attractions such as live jousting in a replica arena.  

The theme park changed ownership to Granada Group in 1986 but it was sold again in 1998 after a management buyout. 

By 2005 only 336,204 visitors came to Camelot every year when it once attracted more than 500,000. Last year Thorpe Park boasted 1.9million visitors.  

There have also been reports of people stealing scrap metal from the park including copper wire and graffiti covers the old buildings that remain

At its peak Camelot Theme Park was one of the North West’s most popular attractions with dozens of rides and attractions such as live jousting in a replica arena

By 2005 only 336,204 visitors came to Camelot every year when it once attracted more than 500,000. Last year Thorpe Park boasted 1.9million visitors

The 140-acre property continued to operate until 2012 when it had to fire 150 members of staff

And then by February 2009 owners Prime Resorts announced the park was in receivership – meaning it was placed in the custodial responsibility for the property of others. 

Companies are usually only placed in receivership if they can’t meet financial obligations. 

A Carlisle-based construction company, Story Group, then bought the theme park and leased it to Knight’s Leisure. 

The 140-acre property continued to operate until 2012 when it had to fire 150 members of staff.  

In 2015 developers Story Homes were refused planning permission by Chorley Borough Council to build 420 new homes on the site.

There has been strong opposition to the plans from residents and local councillors who say the location is not suitable for housing.

After planning permission was refused in the Carlisle-based firm said they would not be appealing but would be looking at revising their plans and consulting with the public and the council to come up with a new scheme. 

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