Inside DMX's emotional final night alive when his family were on their knees begging 'you don't gotta go yet'

WHILE DMX's fans, friends and family hoped for a miracle, it was clear rap icon wasn't going to walk out of the hospital.

The cocaine-induced heart attack that constricted blood circulation to his brain was too much for even the toughest of rap stars to overcome, and Earl Simmons – aka DMX – died at the age of 50 in a Westchester County, New York, hospital on April 9.


DJ Superior – a lifelong friend and one of X's first DJs – and DMX's uncle were in his room the last night on this earth.

"I would've been so happy if he got up. His uncle was on his knees saying, 'You don't gotta go yet,'" DJ Superior told The Sun in an exclusive interview on Tuesday. 

"I was whispering in his ear and just saying, 'Rest man. I got you. I got your kids. But you got a lot of kids.' I think he was looking down laughing at that one.

"It was hard to see him laid out like that, but how I saw it is the world couldn't hurt him anymore," his lifelong friend said. "People were always taking his money, using him, misusing his funds, smiling in his face and then talking bad about him."

DJ Superior recalled a tough moment in time for DMX.

"After he blew up and got the big record deal, the first thing he did was give money to fix a church's roof. It was like $2 million. But the church never got it. Whoever handled the money messed it up."

He said there was finger pointing, but it never came to a resolution and the church never received the money.

"X didn't worship money. It was never about that for him," said DJ Superior, who momentarily paused during the interview to gather himself.

"It's sad talking about X. We lost a legend," he said. "Look the impact DMX had on the world."

"He came from nothing and built himself up."

STRUGGLES WITH ADDICTION

DMX's struggles with addiction were well documented, and the peak behind the curtain was ever more frightening.

"I’ve seen it. You would get high and write rhymes," DJ Superior said.

"It got to a point where he would do shows and sometimes he would go missing after the show or before the show. If Ruff Ryders didn’t do what they did, he wouldn’t have been as big as he was. They gave him a family support system."

DJ Superior said there were times he found DMX in jail after using, or sleeping on the street or selling his clothes for money to get drugs.

He became the man behind the scenes helping DMX get through stormy times.

He didn't hide the fact that he and DMX had fights over the years, but he said they kept their issues to themselves, and he was in the hospital room with DMX's uncle the night he died.

"He was like my brother. I might’ve fought with him because I wanted him to be better, but I always had his back no matter what," he said.

"I told him, 'When you went to jail, who take care of the dogs?' And he loves dogs, and he especially loved Boomer. He didn't let anyone babysit Boomer. I’m the only one that babysat him. That means he loves me and trusts me."

Despite the times of bump roads, DJ Superior was there in the early 1990s recording songs with DMX, Jadakiss and Sheek Louch in the Yonkers projects in what they called "The House of Hits," and he was there on April 9.

"I was there in the beginning and at the end. I loved him," DJ Superior said.

'DMX DAY'

New York State declared DMX's birthday – December 18 – "DMX day."

There will be a large celebration of the rap star's life on School Street in Yonkers, New York, where DMX grew up.

A large mural was painted on the side of a building, in large part because of the hard work from Wilson Kimball, Director of Yonkers Municipal Housing Authority.

DJ Superior will MC the event and will be one of the judges for rap videos sent in for a competition called the "X Factor."

For a day, Yonkers in Westchester County – which is fourth largest city in the city and borders the Bronx – will be a center for the rap world.

It's the same city that legends like Mary J. Blige, Jadakiss, the Lox, among others, and is still producing rap talent.

DJ Superior, who's regarded as one of Yonkers' last Hip Hop gatekeepers, is working on a project to show the world hours of unseen footage of DMX and dozens of unreleased songs recorded before the rapper became a household name in a DVD and an album.

 


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