Man throttled partner when she refused to wear jewellery he bought her

Businessman, 53, who throttled and subjected his girlfriend to bullying campaign when she refused to wear jewellery he bought her is spared jail

  • Jeffrey Stewart, 53, throttled Cheryl Richardson in her bed following argument 
  • Owner of Anchor Pub must stay away from ex and her daughter for three years
  • Stewart admitted to engaging in abusive behaviour over a six month period
  • Dundee Sheriff Court ruled Stewart must also carry out 160 hours unpaid work

Pub owner Jeffrey Stewart (pictured), 53, must stay away from victim Cheryl Richardson for three years and complete 160 hours of unpaid work after admitting to subjecting his ex to a six-month bullying campaign

A pub owner who branded his partner a ‘stuck up c**t’ before throttling her in bed after she refused to wear jewellery he gifted her has been spared jail. 

Jeffrey Stewart, 53, was instead handed a restraining order and must complete 160 hours of unpaid work after admitting to subjecting his ex Cheryl Richardson to a six-month bullying campaign. 

His punishment comes after a previous conviction for domestic abuse and similar allegations from three other former lovers.

Dundee Sheriff Court heard how Stewart and Ms Richardson had a heated argument over the jewellery in October last year. 

When she went to bed, Stewart, who owns The Anchor Pub in Broughty Ferry, ran to the room and grasped her neck and throttled her before eventually letting go after ‘realising what he was doing’, the court heard. 

Ms Richardson left Stewart not long after the attack but the harassing behaviour continued, the court was told, including bombarding her with abusive text messages.

Stewart’s defence cited the fact that he was under ‘financial pressure’ from owning a pub during the pandemic, telling the court he had borrowed money to keep his business afloat. 

Imposing a three year non-harassment order banning Stewart from having any contact with Ms Richardson or her daughter, Sheriff Lorna Drummond said: ‘This is not a trivial matter.

‘I expect that given the circumstances of this case she probably wants nothing further to do with him. I imagine the last thing she wants is further contact.’

Solicitor Scott Norrie, defending, said: ‘He has been fairly pragmatic in recognising he needs help. He continues to take assistance by way of counselling.

‘He accepts the relationship has well and truly ended and both parties are looking to move on in their own direction.’

The court was told that Stewart had a previous conviction for domestic abuse and had been subject to similar allegations from three other former lovers.

Fiscal depute Emily Hood told the court: ‘They started a relationship in May 2014. In October last year Cheryl Richardson and the accused had an argument regarding jewellery.

‘He proceeded to call her a “stuck up c**t” when she said she was not wearing the jewellery. 

‘She went to bed to try and sleep and heard the accused rush along the corridor into the bedroom.

‘While she was in bed he leaned over and put his hands round her neck and started to squeeze. He realised what he was doing and released his grip.’

Ms Richardson said Stewart left the room and subsequently acted as if nothing had happened and as if he had done nothing wrong.

Dundee Sheriff Court (pictured) was told that Stewart had a previous conviction for domestic abuse and had been subject to similar allegations from three other former lovers

By Christmas Eve she had decided to end the relationship but at the end of February she agreed to have dinner with him to check on his welfare.

Stewart made unwanted advances on her and she had to push him away and by the following month he was accusing her of cheating and demanding the return of a car from her.

At one stage he tried to grab a watch off her wrist and he opened a letter addressed to her – which turned out to be an invite to get her Covid-19 vaccination. 

Stewart admitted engaging in a course of abusive behaviour against Ms Richardson between October 1 2020 and March 1 this year.

Solicitor Scott Norrie, defending, said: ‘Mr Stewart is a successful businessman. He is highly regarded in the Broughty Ferry community and is involved in charity work.

‘This has been quite traumatic for him. He recognises his difficulties and has taken steps to immediately seek help. The relationship was very much up and down.

‘There was financial pressure. He borrowed money to make sure the business stayed afloat during the pandemic. He accepts this relationship has ended.’ 

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