Mariah Carey bonded with Derek Jeter over their racial experience

Mariah Carey reveals she bonded with Derek Jeter over their ‘shared racial experience’ and admits affair gave her confidence to leave abusive marriage to Tommy Mottola, as singer dishes on dysfunctional childhood in new memoir

  • Mariah Carey’s new memoir The Meaning of Mariah Carey is out on Tuesday 
  • Carey, 50, dishes on her affair with MLB star Derek Jeter, saying their relationship was a ‘catalyst’ for leaving her abusive marriage to Tommy Mottola
  • The biracial singer said she bonded with Jeter, who has an Irish mother and a black father, over their ‘shared racial experience’
  • Carey married Sony Music President Mottola when she was 23 and he was 44 
  • She writes she slept with a ‘to go’ bag under her bed filled with ‘essentials just in case I had to make a quick escape’
  • The final straw was when Mottola held a butter knife to her face and dragged it down her cheek  
  • Carey also reveals new details about her dysfunctional family and says they treated her like a ‘human ATM with a wig on’ when she became successful
  • At the age of six her brother slammed their mother into a wall so hard it ‘sounded like a gunshot’
  • At the age of 12, Carey claims her older sister drugged her with Valium and cocaine, burned her and tried to sell her to a pimp

Mariah Carey has revealed that her affair with Derek Jeter meant so much because it was a ‘shared racial experience’.

The singer, who is biracial, writes in her new memoir that meeting the former New York Yankees star’s family ‘who looked like mine was very inspiring’.

At the time Carey was in an abusive marriage to Sony Music President Tommy Mottola but being with Jeter helped her to ‘get in touch with my sensuality’.

When she learned Jeter had an Irish mother and a black father ‘it was like the moment in ‘The Wizard of Oz’ when the screen went from black-and-white to Technicolor’.

In the book Carey also reveals new details about her dysfunctional family and says they treated her like a ‘human ATM with a wig on’ when she became successful.

At the age of six her brother slammed their mother into a wall so hard it ‘sounded like a gunshot’.

The book, ‘The Meaning of Mariah Carey’, is out on Tuesday but the New York Times published parts of it ahead of publication.

Mariah Carey has revealed that her affair with Derek Jeter meant so much because it was a ‘shared racial experience’. The singer, who is biracial, writes in her new memoir that meeting the former New York Yankees star’s family ‘who looked like mine was very inspiring’. Pictured: Carey with Jeter in 1998 

At the time Carey was in an abusive marriage to Sony Music President Tommy Mottola but being with Jeter helped her to ‘get in touch with my sensuality’. Carey, 50, says that her affair with Jeter was a ‘catalyst’ for leaving Mottola, who she married at the age of 23 when he was 44. Pictured: Carey and Mottola in 1997 

The book, ‘The Meaning of Mariah Carey’, is out on Tuesday but the New York Times published parts of it ahead of publication

Carey, 50, says that her affair with Jeter was a ‘catalyst’ for leaving Mottola, who she married at the age of 23 when he was 44.

He wooed her with gifts of children’s teddy bears but when they married in 1993 he was a control freak.

Carey writes: ‘I prayed that in doing so he would calm down and loosen his vise grip on my life. There was never really a strong sexual or physical attraction but I gave him my work and my trust’.

Carey slept with a ‘to go’ bag under her bed filled with ‘essentials just in case I had to make a quick escape’.

In the book Carey also reveals new details about her dysfunctional family and says they treated her like a ‘human ATM with a wig on’ when she became successful

The couple lived in a 50 acre compound in Bedford, New York which was ‘fully staffed with armed guards’ and had security cameras in most rooms.

Mottola controlled the music they listened to and the music Carey wrote, instructing her to sound ‘mainstream’, meaning white.

She writes: ‘From the moment Tommy signed me, he tried to wash the ‘urban’ (translation: Black) off of me’.

The final straw was when Mottola held a butter knife to her face and dragged it down her cheek.

She writes: ‘Even now it’s hard to explain, to put into words how I existed in my relationship with Tommy Mottola. It’s not that there are no words, it’s just that they still get stuck moving up from my gut, or they disappear into the thickness of my anxiety’.

Carey’s affair with Jeter gave her the confidence to ’emancipate’ herself from Mottola.

She writes that when she first met Jeter she was turned off by his ‘pointy shoes’ and his ‘Kalamazoo vibe’.

But over dinner her opinion changed when he opened up about his mixed race upbringing.

They began a short and secret affair and Jeter became only the second person she had ever had sex with.

Carey writes: ‘Just like his position on the team, our relationship was a shortstop in my life….he was the catalyst I needed to get out from under Tommy’s crippling control and get in touch with my sensuality. And the intimacy of our shared racial experience was major – to connect with a healthy family who looked like mine was very inspiring’.

The book is unsparing in detailing Carey’s troubled upbringing in Huntington, New York that is a world away from her record 19 chart-topping hits that would come later. She was the youngest member of an interracial family and was three when her parents divorced. Her mother was a white trained opera singer but they were broke and moved house 13 times. Pictured: Carey with her mother as a child 

When she was four, Carey recalls her teachers ‘cackling hysterically’ because she used a brown crayon to color a picture of her father, who is black, because they thought she used the wrong shade

The book is unsparing in detailing Carey’s troubled upbringing in Huntington, New York that is a world away from her record 19 chart-topping hits that would come later.

She was the youngest member of an interracial family and was three when her parents divorced.

Her mother was a white trained opera singer but they were broke and moved house 13 times.

When she was four, Carey recalls her teachers ‘cackling hysterically’ because she used a brown crayon to color a picture of her father, who is black, because they thought she used the wrong shade.

Carey writes: ‘They had only ever seen one member of my family of five: my mother, who dropped me off at school each day.

‘They had no idea and no imagination to suspect that the light toast of my skin, my bigger-than-button nose and the waves and ringlets in my hair were from my father’.

By the time Carey was a toddler she ‘developed the instincts to sense when violence was coming’.

She writes: ‘As though I was smelling rain, I could tell when adult screaming had reached a certain pitch and velocity that meant I should take cover’.

Among the fights she recalls is her brother slamming her mother into a wall when she was six.

Carey called a family friend and said: ‘My brother really hurt my mother, and I’m home alone. Please come help’.


At the age of 12, Carey claims her older sister Allison (left at her wedding to Mottola and right) drugged her with Valium and cocaine, burned her and tried to sell her to a pimp

When the police arrived, one of them looked at his colleague and said: ‘If this kid makes it, it’ll be a miracle’.

At the age of 12, Carey claims her older sister drugged her with Valium and cocaine, burned her and tried to sell her to a pimp.

Carey cried on her 18th birthday and considered herself a failure because she didn’t have a record deal.

But as soon as she became a success her family treated her like an ‘ATM with a wig on’ with no regard for her welfare.

Recounting another episode where she took refuge at a cabin she had bought for her mother, Carey claims that her mum called the police and gave them an ‘odd, knowing look’.

Soon after she was dumped at what she was told was a spa but turned out to be ‘closer to a prison’

Carey writes that her family ‘just happened to claim I was unstable and tried to institutionalize me immediately after I had signed the biggest cash deal for a solo artist in history’.

For all her problems Carey is determined that her two children with comedian and rapper Nick Cannon do not endure the same fate as her.

She writes that nine-year-old twins Moroccan and Monroe – she wanted them to have the same initials as her, MC – ‘do not live in fear’ like she did

Carey has been teasing her memoir over the past few weeks and over the weekend revealed that she made a secret alternative album with the group Chick while she was making her 1995 album Daydream 

She writes that nine-year-old twins Moroccan and Monroe – she wanted them to have the same initials as her, MC – ‘do not live in fear’ like she did.

Carey has been teasing her memoir over the past few weeks and over the weekend revealed that she made a secret alternative album with the group Chick while she was making her 1995 album Daydream.

Carey Tweeted: ‘Fun fact: I did an alternative album while I was making Daydream Eyes, the Grammy-winning singer said. ‘Just for laughs, but it got me through some dark days.’

Speaking to CBS This Morning Carey said that her lowest point was going six days with just two hours sleep around 2001 when she was working on her album ‘Glitter’.

She said: ‘That’s not acceptable. But I allowed myself to be put in a position for that to happen.

‘I was working so hard and I wasn’t about to let everything I’d worked so hard for just to slip away. So, I worked myself into the ground’.

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