Neighbour-from-hell is banned from his village for 15 years

Neighbour-from-hell who chopped down next door’s memorial trees with a chainsaw in long-running boundary dispute is banned from his village for 15 years

  • A neighbour who chopped down next door’s trees has been banned from village
  • Adrian Paul Stairs, 59, must not enter Blisworth until the year 2037 or risks jail
  • Last year he used a chainsaw to cut down several mature shrubs and trees

A neighbour-from-hell who chopped down next door’s memorial trees with a chainsaw in a long-running boundary dispute has been banned from his village for 15 years.

Adrian Paul Stairs, 59, must not enter Blisworth until the year 2037 or risk being sent to prison after he made his next door neighbours’ lives a misery for years in a row.

Last year he used a chainsaw to cut down several mature shrubs and trees planted by the residents’ loved-ones who have since died.

He also threatened his neighbours with a brick.

A Magistrates Court heard that at the beginning of 2021, Northamptonshire Police began to receive reports of anti-social behaviour from the occupants of a house in Blisworth regarding their neighbour, Stairs.

A spokesman for the force said that it became apparent that the bad behaviour had been going on for some time and that others within the community had also been affected.

Adrian Paul Stairs, 59, must not enter Blisworth until the year 2037 or risk being sent to prison after he made his next door neighbours’ lives a misery

‘During his campaign of behaviour, Stairs used a chainsaw to cut down several mature shrubs in his neighbour’s garden which had been planted near to the disputed boundary line,’ they said.

‘Some of these shrubs had been established for more than 20 years and had been given as gifts from family members who have since passed away. As such, there was a strong sentimental value lost.

‘Stairs also assaulted his neighbours by threatening them with a brick during a dispute in the garden, causing the victims to fear imminent harm. Thankfully he did not actually throw it.’  

An investigation was launched by the local Neighbourhood Policing Team supported by the Anti-Social Behaviour Sergeant Wyn Hughes.

The team collected enough evidence to charge Stairs with criminal damage and assault.

They discovered he had terrorised his neighbours and other residents in the village of Blisworth, Northamptonshire, over a prolonged period. 

Stairs has been banned from entering the village for 15 years — meaning he will be aged 74 the next time he is allowed to go there.

In their victim impact statements, residents said they had suffered anxiety, fear and despair due to Stairs’ persistent anti-social behaviour.

They revealed that others villagers, including pensioners in their 80s, had also been targeted by Stairs.

Stairs had terrorised his neighbours and other residents in the village of Blisworth, Northamptonshire, over a prolonged period. File image

Stairs, who has since moved to Wellingborough, Northamptonshire, was handed a six-week prison sentence, suspended for 18 months.

He was also handed a restraining order which prevents him from entering Blisworth for 15 years and from contacting the victims in any way.

Stairs absconded from court before the sentencing hearing and was arrested and appeared at court again on December 2.

He was handed an extra two weeks’ prison sentence which was suspended, along with a 60 day rehabilitation order for absconding from court.

Sergeant Wyn Hughes said: ‘When the victims in this case were informed of the result and the restraining order, it was like a weight was lifted off their shoulders.

‘This is something they have struggled with for so long and therefore I am so pleased for them.

‘However, there are no real winners in this type of case as the impact upon the victims has been significant and prolonged.

‘I hope this case shows our ability to use both criminal and anti-social behaviour legislation in a positive way to protect our residents and keep our communities safer.’ 

Photo shows trees owned by Terry Saville in Kirriemuir, Angus, from the garden of Neil and May Kidd

Earlier this year, a man who claimed trimming his 32ft trees would kill them was ordered to lop them after losing a battle with his neighbours.

Terry Saville had been locked in a war of words with Neil and May Kidd over the trees between their properties in Kirriemuir, Angus.

The frustrated couple had applied to Angus Council to have the conifers lopped under high hedge legislation amid complaints of loss of light to their home.

They were left disappointed when the council issued an order for the trees, which stretch for 82ft in length, to be cut down to 12ft in height.

The Kidds appealed the ruling to the Scottish Government and argued the trees should be trimmed further.

The trees will have to be chopped from 32ft to 12ft after a Angus council ruling found they were infringing on the neighbour’s garden

The trees will have to be chopped from 32ft to 12ft after a Angus council ruling found they were infringing on the neighbour’s garden 

Saville also went to the government and insisted that reducing the trees to 12ft would kill them off.

He also said a ‘tree preservation order (TPO)’ in place at the property had been breached by the council and that the trees provided a backdrop to a new housing estate.

The government upheld the council ruling but issued a slight variation on the trees affected.

Saville had until September this year to carry out the work. 

Val Horton’s bungalow used to overlook Solsbury Hill in Somerset, which is owned by the National Trust, and home to an Iron Age fort

In Somerset, a woman has given up on seeing the spectacular vista from her home, after being locked in 20-year battle with her neighbour over a 50ft leylandii hedge.

Val Horton’s Bathampton bungalow used to overlook Solsbury Hill. But she has admitted defeat as the council said it cannot order her neighbour to chop them down because they don’t block out enough sunlight.

The Leylandii trees planted in 2001 by her neighbour Valerie Vivian have now blocked the ‘wonderful’ view from Ms Horton’s dining room, as they continue to grow into the sky. 

Ms Horton, a retired civil servant, has fought to have the trees cut down for 20 years, and hoped they would be cut under the High Hedges part of the Antisocial Behaviour Act.

But because her home still gets enough light, and the trees do not block access to her property, Bath and North East Somerset Council cannot order the hedgerow to be cut short.

Speaking in August, Ms Horton said that the issue with her spoilt view has ‘exhausted’ her.

The Leylandii trees planted in 2001 have grown into an ‘awful’ 50ft tall ‘forest’

The view of Solsbury Hill before the trees grew and blocked the view of the Somerset vista

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