People smuggler, 34, is jailed for ten years

People smuggler, 34, who charged migrants £12,000 to cross the Channel into the UK even though he ‘knew they’d be caught’ is jailed for ten years

  • Nzar Jabar Mohamad, 34, boasted about charging migrants £10-12,000 fees
  • Fees covered passage to UK, despite knowing they likely wouldn’t get past Dover
  • The NCA bugged his home in Hull before arresting him in November 2019
  • Was jailed at Hull Crown Court for 10 years after pleading guilty to conspiracy to help asylum seekers enter the UK 

A people smuggler who could have put hundreds of lives at risk by shipping migrants across busy English Channel shipping lanes in flimsy dinghies has been jailed for ten years.

Nzar Jabar Mohamad, 34, boasted about charging migrants £10-12,000 for passage to the UK – even though he knew it was likely they would never make it past Dover even after the perilous crossing.

But he did not have a clue he was being eavesdropped on by the National Crime Agency, who had bugged his home in Hull, East Yorkshire.

After hearing that a recent smuggling operation had gone wrong and all the migrants had been rounded up, he shrugged off the disaster, saying: ‘They were all caught.

‘All of mine were caught. I knew they would be before the crossing.

‘There is nothing wrong with the sea. I do not know why they are afraid of it.’

Nzar Jabar Mohamad, 34, (pictured) boasted about charging migrants £10-12,000 for passage to the UK – even though he knew they would be probably never make it past Dover even after the perilous crossing

Hull Crown Court was told if a migrant was subsequently ‘caught at Dover he would have been paid. If caught at Calais he would not.’

Prosecutor Paul Mitchell QC said in November 2019, the NCA realised their target had acquired a dinghy with an outboard motor – and life vests for 21 passengers.

The dinghy went missing before the crossing – to the rage of the defendant who demanded the boat or his money back.

He was arrested at his home in Hull, where he had arrived on the back of a lorry in July 2019, shortly afterwards, with only £30 to his name.

Jailing him for ten years, with half to be served, Judge John Thackray QC said: ‘This is an offence designed to circumvent the immigration rules.

‘The offence calls for a deterrent sentence since the problem with immigration control is a substantial one, causing grave public concern.

‘That is the gravamen of the case – not the profit margin.

‘Central to the sentencing is the entirely cynical and callous disregard for immigration law in the UK and the determination to circumvent it.

‘Add to that, the acute human misery visited upon a number of people.

‘The court cannot ignore the misery caused by illegal immigration and the huge risk of loss of life as a result of efforts to enter the country covertly.

‘For example – by trying to navigate probably the busiest shipping channel in the world in wholly inadequate small inflatable boats.’

‘You were motivated by greed and had no regard for the welfare of others – saying, as you did, ‘There is nothing wrong with the sea’.

Jailing him for ten years at Hull Crown Court (pictured), with half to be served, Judge John Thackray QC said: ‘This is an offence designed to circumvent the immigration rules’

‘You are wrong about that Mr Mohamad because there most certainly is when you are in an overcrowded dinghy in a busy shipping channel with no navigational equipment.

‘History has shown that fatalities are almost inevitable.’

The judge underlined that the number of insidiously involved in the breach of immigration law was ‘potentially hundreds’, adding:

‘Your operations would undoubtedly have continued until detection. The risk of harm was enormous even if the actual harm was limited because of your detection by the authorities.

‘As it was there were numerous expeditions – 241 photographs of boats and 37 weather reports perhaps give some indication of the scale involved and the number involved.

‘There were elements of sophistication. Different methods were used – vehicular and by boat. Fraudulent passports were used. You planned crossings carefully.

‘On occasions, you acted as a middleman but you also took a leading and operational role on numerous occasions.’

The judge added the sentence would have been 11 years and six months had it not been for the guilty plea and that had ‘come very late in the day’.

The judge added: ‘You knew you were guilty from the outset and explored all options before pleading guilty.’

Mohamad, also known as Nazar Masefi, of Waterloo Street, admitted conspiring to facilitate illegal immigration. 

Shufqat Khan, mitigating, said his client was from a poor background and his offences were a misguided attempt to impress his parents in Kurdistan.

Source: Read Full Article