Sales of new petrol and diesel cars could be BANNED by 2035

Sales of new petrol and diesel cars could be BANNED by 2035 – five years earlier than planned – as Boris Johnson seeks to boost his green credentials

  • Current plan  is to outlaw new fossil fuel vehicle sales by 2040
  • But a consultation will be launched soon on bringing it forward five years
  • It would bring the UK closer to deadlines set in Denmark, Ireland and Sweden

A ban on sales of polluting diesel and petrol cars could be brought forward by five years to 2035, it was reported today, as Boris Johnson seeks to burnish his green credentials.

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps announced a desire to speed up the current plan for a prohibition which would favour electric replacements by 2040 at last year’s Tory party conference in Manchester.

But following the election win in December plans are underway to move it forward by five years, leaving electric cars the only new option for motorists, the Sun reported.

A public consultation could be released shortly, as well as plans to cut down on wider plastics use.

While axing fossil fuel car sales would be controversial – not least for the motor industry – it would bring Britain closer in-line with other European nations such as Denmark, Ireland, the Netherlands and Sweden, which have bans in place from 2030.

Following the election win in December plans are underway to move the ban forward by five years, leaving electric cars the only new option for motorists

Transport Secretary Grant Shapps (right) announced a desire to speed up the current plan for a prohibition by 2040 at last year’s Tory party conference in Manchester

Speaking at the Manchester conference last September Mr Shapps said: ‘The Government’s advisory Committee on Climate Change has said 2035 is a date for which we should aim.

‘We will need to test the arguments and work in partnership with industry to examine how to proceed.

‘Just as we rejuvenated our automotive sector in the 1980s, we’re going to work with our pioneering car sector to help them sell the next generation of vehicles around the world.

‘Providing high-skilled jobs, utilising British know-how and ending dependence of fossil fuels.’

  

 

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