Uri Geller's Scottish island is finally rid of solitary rat

Uri Geller praises kayakers who spent a year tracking down lone rat on Scottish island that he bought for £30,000 because he thought it hid treasure buried by Tutankhamen’s sister

  • Israeli-British self-proclaimed psychic purchased Lamb Island, in the Firth of Forth, in 2009 
  • He is convinced it is home to treasure buried by the pharaoh’s half-sister, Scota
  • Volunteers from Lothian Sea Kayak Club traced down rat after spotting it on a motion-triggered camera; it ate poison from trap and is missing presumed dead

Celebrity spoon-bender Uri Geller has praised a group of kayakers for finally ridding his Scottish island of a solitary rat after they spent a year tracking it.

The Israeli-British self-proclaimed psychic purchased Lamb Island, in the Firth of Forth, in 2009 for £30,000 after becoming convinced that it was home to treasure buried by Pharaoh Tutankhamen’s half-sister, Scota.

Lamb Island is one of three rocky outcrops which mirror the layout of the Pyramids at Giza, near Cairo – and Geller believes in a legend which points to the exiled Egyptian princess as having hidden treasure on it. 

When a rat was detected there by conservationists in November 2020, it was decided action needed to be taken as rodents pose a threat to nesting birds, including puffins and cormorants.

But rather than call upon Geller, 75, to use his particular set of skills to track down the invasive predator, a different team rose to the challenge – volunteers from the Lothian Sea Kayak Club, with support from experts at the Scottish Seabird Centre in North Berwick.

Celebrity spoon-bender Uri Geller has praised a group of kayakers for ridding his Scottish island of a solitary rat after they spent a year tracking it. The self-proclaimed psychic bought Lamb Island, in the Firth of Forth, in 2009 after becoming convinced it was home to treasure buried by Pharaoh Tutankhamen’s half-sister, Scota. (Above, Geller on the island in 2010)

Volunteers from the Lothian Sea Kayak Club, with support from experts at the Scottish Seabird Centre in North Berwick, managed to track the lone rat (above) – which was caught on a motion-triggered camera 

Above, the Lothian Sea Kayak Club. They set down a number of rat traps containing food laced with poison. The vermin subsequently nibbled some of it, has not been seen since December and is missing presumed dead

Landing access to the uninhabited island is difficult for large boats, so the kayak team was ideal for the mission. 

The team made 35 trips and used motion-triggered cameras to establish that just one rat was present.

They set down a number of rat traps containing food laced with poison. The vermin subsequently nibbled some of it, has not been seen since December and is missing presumed dead. 

‘I was astounded when I saw the infrared image of the rat. My island is not that tiny so to locate one rat is a big achievement. Thank you very much, a big hug and good positive energy from me to them,’ Geller told BBC Scotland.

Lamb Island is one of three rocky outcrops which mirror the layout of the Pyramids at Giza, near Cairo – and Geller believes in a legend which points to the exiled Egyptian princess as having hidden treasure on it

It is not known how the rat got to the island in the first place. 

One possibility is that it swam the short distance from the mainland – or it could have been thrown overboard after stowing away on a boat. 

Emily Burton, conservation officer at the Scottish Seabird Centre, told The Times: ‘[The poison] took so long to work because rats are neophobic – innately afraid of new things. 

‘He avoided these tempting treats for months but finally we saw blocks of rodenticide had been gnawed off and taken away.’ 

Geller, who lives in Israel with his wife, rose to fame in the 1970s with an act based around his apparent psychic powers and telepathy skills, which were even tested by the CIA

Speaking on urigeller.com about his love of Lamb Island, the illusionist said: ‘The connection has been known for centuries. 

‘You can read about it in a 15th century manuscript called the Scotichronicon, by the Abbot of Inchcolm, Walter Bower. 

‘This island has links not only to the pyramids, but to King Arthur, King Robert the Bruce and to the ancient Kings of Ireland too. 

‘It might seem forbidding, and it is certainly uninhabitable, but it is also one of the keystones to British mythology, and I am thrilled to be its owner.’

Geller, who lives in Israel with his wife,  rose to fame in the 1970s with an act based around his apparent psychic powers and telepathy skills, which were even tested by the CIA.

He is best known for his trademark spoon-bending trick.

Among the many spoons in his collection are some that formerly belonged to famous people, including Napoleon, John F. Kennedy, Elvis Presley, the Dalai Lama and Gandhi.

Source: Read Full Article